Is former Suffolk Police Chief James Burke connected to LISK?

Could it be true? That’s what John Ray, attorney for Shannan Gilbert’s family, is suggesting. In an explosive news conference on Thursday, Ray brought forth a Long Island escort named “Leanne” who claims about a year after Gilbert went missing, she was roughed up in a sexual encounter with former Suffolk Police Chief James Burke in an Oak Beach house party where alcohol and cocaine were prevalent.  Leanne claims Burke choked her and forced her into oral sex after calling her a “not a good whore” and paying her for her services in 2011, just months before he assumed the role of police chief. Leanne also claims to have had several other Suffolk County police officers as clients and offered to take a lie detector test to back up her story.
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Previously unidentified victim now positively linked to the Gilgo Beach murders

I’ve been following the Long Island Serial Killer case for years, and I think this might be the biggest reveal we’ve seen yet. In 1997, nineteen years ago, a woman’s torso was discovered in Hempstead Lake State Park. Her identity is still unknown, but investigators have been calling her “Peaches” since the discovery, referring to a heart-shaped peach that was tattooed onto her left breast. Her torso was found wrapped in a black plastic bag and placed inside a green Rubbermaid bin that was left in a wooded area in Rockville Centre. Police know that Peaches was a black woman between 20 and 30 years old. Her torso showed signs of a surgical Cesarean section scar.
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Should familial DNA searching be legal in all 50 states?

Logo for CODIS: Combined DNA Index SystemYou know the drill: a murder is committed and investigators gather evidence from the crime scene–fingerprints, strands of hair, and, if they’re lucky, DNA. Once a DNA profile is obtained, police enter it into the national CODIS database, searching for a match. CODIS stands for Combined DNA Index System, a program supported and run by the FBI. One part of CODIS is the NDIS, or the National DNA Index System, which contains DNA profiles contributed by the federal, state, and local law enforcement. Whenever law enforcement enters a new DNA profile into CODIS, it is in hopes that the computer program will return a match. Sometimes that match comes in the form of another crime scene that has been entered into the system that maybe police did not think were linked. Sometimes that match comes in the form of a direct hit on an individual whose DNA has already been submitted into the system after a prior conviction. Sometimes there is no match at all and the case turns cold. In the rarest of occasions, however, there is another kind of hit–a familial match.
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